Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences | JIRCAS

Prediction of enteric methane emission from beef cattle in Southeast Asia

Description

Improving national greenhouse gas (GHG) inventories is important in projecting GHG emission trends and constructing mitigation strategies. The significant contributions of enteric methane (CH4) emissions to global GHG emissions indicate the necessity for improving CH4 emission estimates. Enteric CH4 from ruminants is produced during fermentation of dietary carbohydrates in the rumen, and consequently, enteric CH4 emission is principally affected by feed intake and the type and digestibility of feed. Therefore, various equations based on dietary intake and its components for estimating enteric CH4 emission have been provided for animal species, production systems, and regions. However, little information is available in Southeast Asia, a region characterized by producing large numbers of beef cattle in monsoonal agricultural systems focused on rice production. To develop equations for estimating enteric CHemissions from beef cattle in Southeast Asia using commonly available indices, we carried out meta-data analysis using data obtained in Thailand and Vietnam.

During the period 2005–2015, individual data (n = 332) were collected from 25 studies carried out in Thailand and Vietnam using a ventilated respiration apparatus equipped with a head hood. The dataset included observations on feed chemical composition, nutrient intakes, digestibilities, and CH4 emissions. The animals from which data were obtained were Brahman male cattle (n = 171), Thai native male cattle (n = 121), and Lai Sind male cattle (n = 40; Photo 1).

The best equation to predict daily CHemissions included dry matter intake and ether extract contents (Equation 1 in Table 1). The equation including only dry matter intake as a variable was also good for prediction (Equation 2). The best equation to predict methane conversion factor, expressed as CHenergy as a portion of gross energy intake, was obtained using DMI per body weight, content of ether extract and crude protein, and DM digestibility (Equation 3). Mean methane conversion factor (MCF) of cattle group fed roughage under 33% in their feed as DM was higher than that of cattle group fed over 67% in their feed (Table 2). Those MCFs were higher than default MCF by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC; 6.5 ± 1.0%) for cattle, excluding fattening cattle fed diets containing 90% or more concentrates. These higher MCFs were considered to reflect the characteristics of cattle feed containing relatively higher fiber contents in Southeast Asia. These present equations are applicable to improving CHemission estimation in Southeast Asia.

Figure, table

  1. Photo 1. Cattle breeds used in measuring methane emissions
    Photo 1. Cattle breeds used in measuring methane emissions

  2. Table 1. Regression equations for predicting daily methane emission and methane energy as a proportion of gross energy intake in cattle

     
     
    RMSE
    R2
     
    (1)
    CH4 = 22.67×DMI - 3.73×EE + 23.32
    18.64
    0.783
     
    (2)
    CH4 = 22.71×DMI + 8.91
    19.36
    0.766
     
    (3)
    MCF = -0.782×DMIBW - 0.436×EE-0.073×CP + 0.049×DMD + 8.654
    1.348
    0.391
    CH4, daily methane emission (g/day); MCF, methane conversion factor expressed as methane
    energy as a portion of gross energy intake (J/100 J); DMI, dry matter (DM) intake (kg/day); EE, ether extract content (% DM); CP, crude protein content (% DM); NDF, content of neutral detergent fiber (% DM); DMD, DM digestibility (%); DMIBW, DMI per BW (kg/100 kg); RMSE, root mean square error.
  3. Fig. 1. Methane conversion factors in cattle by roughage proportion groups. Cattle were separated by roughage proportion (DM basis) into Low roughage (≤0.33 kg/kg), Medium roughage (0.34–0.67 kg/kg), and High roughage (≥0.68 kg/kg) groups. Dashed line sho
    Fig. 1. Methane conversion factors in cattle by roughage proportion groups. Cattle were separated by roughage proportion (DM basis) into Low roughage (≤0.33 kg/kg), Medium roughage (0.34–0.67 kg/kg), and High roughage (≥0.68 kg/kg) groups. Dashed line shows default methane conversion factor for cattle excluding feedlot fed cattle. abP<0.05

Affiliation

Crop, Livestock and Environment Division, JIRCAS, Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences

Country
  • Thailand
  • Viet Nam
  • Research project

    “Climate Change Measures in Agricultural Systems” Development of agricultural technologies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and climate-related risks in developing countries

    Program name

    Environment and Natural Resource Management

    Term of research

    FY2018 (FY2014-FY2018)

    Responsible researcher
  • Suzuki Tomoyuki (Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science, NARO)
  • Sommart Kritapon (Khon Kaen University)
  • Arun Phromloungsri (Khon Kaen University)
  • Angthong Wanna (Department of Livestock Development, Ruminants Feeding Standard Research and Development Center, Thailand)
  • Nguyen Van Thu (Can Tho University)
  • Chaokaur Annan (Silpakorn University)
  • Nitipot Peerapot (Kalasin University)
  • Cai Yumin (Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science, NARO)
  • Nishida Takehiro (Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine)
  • Terada Fuminori (Tohoku University)
  • Sakai Takashi (University of Miyazaki)
  • Kawashima Tomoyuki (University of Miyazaki)
  • Publication, etc.

    Suzuki T et al. (2018) Animal Science Journal, 89:1287-1295 DOI: 10.1111/asj.13058

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