Primary factors to improve management of dairy farms in suburbs of the Mongolian capital

Description

       In Mongolia, which is located in arid and semi-arid zones, nomadism is a traditional way of life but is at the mercy of weather conditions. The animal husbandry industry, which is chiefly nomadic, continues to serve as a pillar of the economy. After the transition to a market economy in 1990, nomadic herders rapidly increased their livestock numbers. The country then suffered record snow-cold disasters (Dzud) during the three successive winter-spring periods of 1999-2002 for the first time in a half-century, which were fatal to about one third of the total livestock as of the end of 1999. After this experience, nomads began to discuss giving up nomadism, which is susceptible to the influence of climate change, in favor of residing permanently in city suburban zones, and starting intensive animal husbandry, especially dairy farming. The Mongolian government is also adopting a policy of promoting more intensive settled and semi-settled types of animal husbandry.
  It must be verified whether settled and semi-settled types of animal husbandry, accompanied by the production and purchase of feed, are economically sustainable in arid and semi-arid zones like Mongolia, where many previous studies have concluded that nomadism is the optimal means of animal husbandry.
  To investigate this, a dairy farm survey that targeted dairy households in the Ulaanbaatar suburbs was implemented in 2004 with the cooperation of the Mongolian State University of Agriculture to investigate dairy management.
  Analyses of the economic viability of dairy farming were carried out using data from 30 surveyed dairy farms. The average net profit rate of these farms was approximately 25%, showing them to be sufficiently profitable and apparently economically viable at present.
  To identify the primary factors influencing milk shipment per milking cow and net profit rate to milk sales, regression analyses were carried out using explanatory variables such as labor, animal feed, and milk prices. These analyses revealed that a higher amount of concentrate feed per milking cow and larger numbers of milking cows were the most important factors in increasing milk shipment per milking cow. On the other hand, higher milk prices and larger numbers of milking cows were the most important factors in increasing net profit rate to milk sales.

Figure, table

  1. Table 1. Deciding factors of milk shipment per milking cow.

    Table 1. Deciding factors of milk shipment per milking cow.
  2. Table 2. Deciding factors of net profit rate to milk sales.

    Table 2. Deciding factors of net profit rate to milk sales.
Affiliation

Development Research Division

Classification

Technical A

Country

Mongolia

Term of research

FY2004~2005

Responsible researcher

KOMIYAMA Hiroshi ( Development Research Division )

ほか
Publication, etc.

KOMIYAMA, H. [Abstract of the Japanese Joint Statistical Meeting 2005], 396-397.

KOMIYAMA, H. [Abstract of Spring meeting of the Japanese Society of Regional and Agricultural Development 2005], 30-31.

Japanese PDF

2006_seikajouhou_A4_ja_Part2.pdf509.05 KB